Liffengren genealogy on line at 

http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/82699357/family/pedigree


Maternal descent

Craig Hullinger  1947-

Louise Hullinger 1924-2014

Edna Sophia Anderson 1901-1979

Ida Caroline Kaasa 1877-1957

Sigrid Undi Espeseth 1842-1922

Anna Hagen

Kerri Hoperstad



Our Ancestors From Minoa (Ancient Crete, Greece)

"it's interesting to note that one of the Minoan mtDNA sequences belonged to the rare H13a1a haplogroup."   

(H13a1a is the mtDNA of Edna Anderson and all of her female ancestors and descendants on the female line. I like it that we are rare. And I like it that we or at least our ancient cousins were in Minoa, which is Crete, Greece.  I was there three years ago and really like it.  Now, how they got to Norway is a mystery, but they were a nautical people.)

"Both 
H13a1a and R1b were recently found in late Neolithic Bell Beaker remains from Germany (see here and here). Moreover, today H13a1a shows a peak in frequency and diversity in the Caucasus, particularly in Dagestan, but also occurs at low frequencies in Italy, Sardinia and Iberia."

Click to read the full article




H13a1a in Minoa and Norway

Some background on the H13a1a MtDNA Haplogroup which is shared by Louise Liffengren and all of the women in her maternal line and their children.

The articles indicate that it was a lineage in Minoa, one of the world's first civilizations in Crete, Greece, before travelling to western Europe and Norway.

http://www.haplogroup.org/blog/2013/05/14/a-european-population-in-minoan-bronze-age-crete/



  • Eurogenes Blog: High mtDNA affinity between Bronze Age ...

    eurogenes.blogspot.com/.../high-mtdna-affinity-between-bronze-age.htm...

    May 15, 2013 - Both H13a1a and R1b were recently found in late Neolithic Bell Beaker remains from Germany (see here and here). Moreover, today H13a1a ...
    You visited this page on 10/28/14.
  • Family Tree DNA - H13 - mtDNA Haplogroup

    https://www.familytreedna.com/public/.../default.aspx?...

    Family Tree DNA
    140+ items - The table below shows each project member’s kit number ...
    Kit Number
    Maternal Ancestor Name
    HVR2 Mutations
    164954
    Vasilia Angelina, died about 1960, Monastiri, Gree
    G73A, C146T ...
    123390
    Schlönwitz (Schloenwitz), Prussia
    G73A, C146T ...
    You've visited this page 3 times. Last visit: 10/28/14
  • Haplogroup H (mtDNA) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haplogroup_H_(mtDNA)

    Wikipedia
    In human mitochondrial genetics, Haplogroup H is a human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup that likely originated in Southwest Asia 20,000-25,000 YBP ...
    Origin - ‎Distribution - ‎Subclades - ‎Tree
  • I had my DNA tested! | timwheatley.org

    timwheatley.org/www/2012/07/02/i-had-my-dna-tested

    Jul 2, 2012 - My maternal haplogroup is H13a1a. The group originated in the Near East (Russia), moving through Europe after the peak of the Ice Age ...
    You visited this page on 10/28/14.
  • A European population in Minoan Bronze Age Crete

    www.haplogroup.org/.../a-european-population-in-minoan-bronze-age-c...

    May 14, 2013 - Hg: H13a1a. HVR1: CRS. _____. HVR2: CR: A11374C A11375T. HVR1: Minoan3AH. Hg: T2. HVR1: 16126(C), 16294(T), 16296(T), 16304(C).
    You visited this page on 10/28/14.
  • Statistics - Swedish Haplogroup Database (stats haplomap)

    www.dna.scangen.se/index.php?show...H13a1a...

    Swedish Haplogroup Database, FTDNA Swedish DNA Project, Other databases, FTDNA + other. Mt haplogroup: H13a1a (and subclades) (exactly) Total: 0 ...
  • For what they were... we are: Ancient Minoan mtDNA

    forwhattheywereweare.blogspot.com/2013/.../ancient-minoan-mtdna.htm...

    May 17, 2013 - Minoan mtDNA (N=37): H : 32.4% (12 samples, including one H5, one H7, one H13a1a) T : 18.9% (7 samples, including one T1, 3 T2, one T3, ...
  • Минойцы генетически близки западным европейцам 1

    mouglley-gen.livejournal.com/16178.html
    May 20, 2013 - Both H13a1a and R1b were recently found in late Neolithic Bell Beaker remains from Germany (see here and here). Moreover, today H13a1a ...
  • Correlation of R1b with mt DNA H? autosomal DNA? - Page 5 ...

    www.anthrogenica.com › ... › R1b General

    May 17, 2013 - 10 posts - ‎4 authors
    Now, both H13a1a and R1b were recently found in late Neolithic Bell Beaker remains from Germany (see here and here). Moreover, today ...
  • [PDF]Timing and deciphering mitochondrial DNA macro ...

    www.biomedcentral.com/content/.../1471-2148-8-191.p...

    BioMed Central
    by A Brandstätter - ‎2008 - ‎Cited by 22 - ‎Related articles
    Jul 4, 2008 - H13a1a. 22. 1.6. H14. 16. 1.2. H14a. 2. 0.2. H15. 20. 1.5. H16. 18. 1.3. H17. 7. 0.5. H21. 1. 0.1. HV_nonH. 21. 1.6. HV0. 14. 1.0. HV0a. 4. 0.3.


  • DNA Test From The Genographic Project, National Geographic


    _________________

    My general DNA information below is of course a 50 / 50 mix of Louise Liffengren Hullinger and Clifford Hullinger, so your DNA will be somewhat different.  Still, it give someone who is a Liffengren a little insight into their DNA.

    WHO AM I?

    We are all more than the sum of our parts, but the results below offer some of the most dramatic and fascinating information in your Geno 2.0 test. In this section, we display your affiliations with a set of nine world regions. This information is determined from your entire genome so we’re able to see both parents’ information, going back six generations. Your percentages reflect both recent influences and ancient genetic patterns in your DNA due to migrations as groups from different regions mixed over thousands of years. Your ancestors also mixed with ancient, now extinct hominid cousins like Neanderthals in Europe and the Middle East or the Denisovans in Asia. If you have a very mixed background, the pattern can get complicated quickly! Use the reference population matches below to help understand your particular result.  VIEW THE "WHO AM I" VIDEO

    YOUR RESULTS

    map

    44%

    NORTHERN EUROPEAN

    This component of your ancestry is found at highest frequency in northern European populations—people from the UK, Denmark, Finland, Russia and Germany in our reference populations. While not limited to these groups, it is found at lower frequencies throughout the rest of Europe. This component is likely the signal of the earliest hunter-gatherer inhabitants of Europe, who were the last to make the transition to agriculture as it moved in from the Middle East during the Neolithic period around 8,000 years ago.
    Note: In some cases regional percentages may not total 100%.

    WHAT YOUR RESULTS MEAN

    Modern day indigenous populations around the world carry particular blends of these regions. We compared your DNA results to the reference populations we currently have in our database and estimated which of these were most similar to you in terms of the genetic markers you carry. This doesn’t necessarily mean that you belong to these groups or are directly from these regions, but that these groups were a similar genetic match and can be used as a guide to help determine why you have a certain result. Remember, this is a mixture of both recent (past six generations) and ancient patterns established over thousands of years, so you may see surprising regional percentages. Read each of the population descriptions below to better interpret your particular result.

    YOUR FIRST REFERENCE POPULATION: FINNISH

    This reference population is based on samples collected from people native to Finland. The dominant 57% Northern European component likely reflects the earliest settlers in Europe, hunter-gatherers who arrived there more than 35,000 years ago. The 17% Mediterranean and 17% Southwest Asian percentages arrived later, with the spread of agriculture from the Fertile Crescent in the Middle East, over the past 10,000 years. As these early farmers moved into Europe, they spread their genetic patterns as well. Today, northern European populations retain the links to both earliest Europeans and these later migrants from the Middle East. The 7% Northeast Asian component reflects mixing with native Siberian populations, particularly the reindeer-herding Saami people of far northern Scandinavia.

    FINNISH

    • NORTHERN EUROPEAN

      57%

    • SOUTHWEST ASIAN

      17%

    • MEDITERRANEAN

      17%

    • NORTHEAST ASIAN

      7%

    YOU

    • 44%

      NORTHERN EUROPEAN

    • 34%

      MEDITERRANEAN

    • 20%

      SOUTHWEST ASIAN

    YOUR SECOND REFERENCE POPULATION: GREEK

    This reference population is based on samples collected from the native population of Greece. The 54% Mediterranean and 17% Southwest Asian percentages reflect the strong influence of agriculturalists from the Fertile Crescent in the Middle East, who arrived here more than 8,000 years ago. The 28% Northern European component likely comes from the pre-agricultural population of Europe—the earliest settlers, who arrived more than 35,000 years ago during the Upper Paleolithic period. Today, this component predominates in northern European populations, while the Mediterranean component is more common in southern Europe.

    GREEK

    • MEDITERRANEAN

      54%

    • NORTHERN EUROPEAN

      28%

    • SOUTHWEST ASIAN

      17%

    YOU

    • 44%

      NORTHERN EUROPEAN

    • 34%

      MEDITERRANEAN

    • 20%

      SOUTHWEST ASIAN

    YOUR HOMINID ANCESTRY

    When our ancestors first migrated out of Africa around 60,000 years ago, they were not alone. At that time, at least two other species of hominid cousins walked the Eurasian landmass: Neanderthals and Denisovans. Most non-Africans are about 2% Neanderthal. The Denisovan component of your Geno 2.0 results is more experimental, as we are still working to determine the best way to assess the percentage Denisovan ancestry you carry. The evolution of this data is another way you are actively involved in helping advance knowledge of anthropological genetics!

    New DNA Test


    Craig Hullinger recently had a DNA test done with National Geographic.  The graphic above shows that I am 1.8% Neanderthal - I always suspected it. His mother Louise Liffengren Hullinger is convinced that the Neanderthal could not have come from the Liffengren side of our family - it must be from the Hullingers.

    My MtDNA Haplogroup - the DNA passed from mother to child - is H13ala.  All the women descended from Barbo Tronrud and their descendants and all of their maternal ancestors share this MtDNA Haplogroup.

    The H MtDNA is the dominant Haplogroup in Europe. About 1/2 of European women are of this group.

    The H13ala is a subgroup of H and is far more rare. About 3% of the maternal lineages in Norway are this Haplogroup. The map below shows the path that our maternal ancestors took when leaving from Africa and migrating to Europe.




    The map below shows the distribution of people of the "H" Haplogroup. It is the widest spread group in Europe.



    BRANCH: H13

    AGE: 17,500 ± 4,200 YEARS AGO

    LOCATION OF ORIGIN: CENTRAL ASIA

    Groups containing this lineage lived in the harsh climate of the Caucasus. From there, some have migrated to Europe and West Asia.
    Today, this line is present at low frequency in both Asia and Europe, but its highest population frequency and diversity is present in the Caucasus. There, it is prominent in Dagestan (15 percent) and in Georgia (13.3 percent).
    In West Asia, it is over 18 percent of some population groups in Iraq and about 13 percent of the population in United Arab Emirates.
    In Europe, it is 3 to 4 percent of maternal lineages in Italy, 3 percent of maternal lineages in Norway, and about 2 percent of maternal lineages in Turkey.
    Note: This branch is not accompanied by a major movement on the map, and research on this branch is continuing.



    _________________

    My general DNA information below is of course a 50 / 50 mix of Louise Liffengren Hullinger and Clifford Hullinger, so your DNA will be somewhat different.  Still, it give someone who is a Liffengren a little insight into their DNA.  They find that my DNA is most like a Finn - who knew?  Don't tell our Norwegian relatives. Of course we can blame some of this on the Hullinger side.

    WHO AM I?

    We are all more than the sum of our parts, but the results below offer some of the most dramatic and fascinating information in your Geno 2.0 test. In this section, we display your affiliations with a set of nine world regions. This information is determined from your entire genome so we’re able to see both parents’ information, going back six generations. Your percentages reflect both recent influences and ancient genetic patterns in your DNA due to migrations as groups from different regions mixed over thousands of years. Your ancestors also mixed with ancient, now extinct hominid cousins like Neanderthals in Europe and the Middle East or the Denisovans in Asia. If you have a very mixed background, the pattern can get complicated quickly! Use the reference population matches below to help understand your particular result.  VIEW THE "WHO AM I" VIDEO

    YOUR RESULTS

    map

    44%

    NORTHERN EUROPEAN

    This component of your ancestry is found at highest frequency in northern European populations—people from the UK, Denmark, Finland, Russia and Germany in our reference populations. While not limited to these groups, it is found at lower frequencies throughout the rest of Europe. This component is likely the signal of the earliest hunter-gatherer inhabitants of Europe, who were the last to make the transition to agriculture as it moved in from the Middle East during the Neolithic period around 8,000 years ago.
    Note: In some cases regional percentages may not total 100%.

    WHAT YOUR RESULTS MEAN

    Modern day indigenous populations around the world carry particular blends of these regions. We compared your DNA results to the reference populations we currently have in our database and estimated which of these were most similar to you in terms of the genetic markers you carry. This doesn’t necessarily mean that you belong to these groups or are directly from these regions, but that these groups were a similar genetic match and can be used as a guide to help determine why you have a certain result. Remember, this is a mixture of both recent (past six generations) and ancient patterns established over thousands of years, so you may see surprising regional percentages. Read each of the population descriptions below to better interpret your particular result.

    YOUR FIRST REFERENCE POPULATION: FINNISH

    This reference population is based on samples collected from people native to Finland. The dominant 57% Northern European component likely reflects the earliest settlers in Europe, hunter-gatherers who arrived there more than 35,000 years ago. The 17% Mediterranean and 17% Southwest Asian percentages arrived later, with the spread of agriculture from the Fertile Crescent in the Middle East, over the past 10,000 years. As these early farmers moved into Europe, they spread their genetic patterns as well. Today, northern European populations retain the links to both earliest Europeans and these later migrants from the Middle East. The 7% Northeast Asian component reflects mixing with native Siberian populations, particularly the reindeer-herding Saami people of far northern Scandinavia.

    FINNISH

    • NORTHERN EUROPEAN

      57%

    • SOUTHWEST ASIAN

      17%

    • MEDITERRANEAN

      17%

    • NORTHEAST ASIAN

      7%

    YOU

    • 44%

      NORTHERN EUROPEAN

    • 34%

      MEDITERRANEAN

    • 20%

      SOUTHWEST ASIAN

    YOUR SECOND REFERENCE POPULATION: GREEK

    This reference population is based on samples collected from the native population of Greece. The 54% Mediterranean and 17% Southwest Asian percentages reflect the strong influence of agriculturalists from the Fertile Crescent in the Middle East, who arrived here more than 8,000 years ago. The 28% Northern European component likely comes from the pre-agricultural population of Europe—the earliest settlers, who arrived more than 35,000 years ago during the Upper Paleolithic period. Today, this component predominates in northern European populations, while the Mediterranean component is more common in southern Europe.

    GREEK

    • MEDITERRANEAN

      54%

    • NORTHERN EUROPEAN

      28%

    • SOUTHWEST ASIAN

      17%

    YOU

    • 44%

      NORTHERN EUROPEAN

    • 34%

      MEDITERRANEAN

    • 20%

      SOUTHWEST ASIAN

    YOUR HOMINID ANCESTRY

    When our ancestors first migrated out of Africa around 60,000 years ago, they were not alone. At that time, at least two other species of hominid cousins walked the Eurasian landmass: Neanderthals and Denisovans. Most non-Africans are about 2% Neanderthal. The Denisovan component of your Geno 2.0 results is more experimental, as we are still working to determine the best way to assess the percentage Denisovan ancestry you carry. The evolution of this data is another way you are actively involved in helping advance knowledge of anthropological genetics!